hey, psyche

I am in the mood to dissolve in the sky.

Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

(Source: theloudest--minds)

I’m tired, can’t think of anything and want only to lay my face in your lap, feel your hand on my head and remain like that through all eternity.
Lake Erie

Lake Erie

Lake Erie

Lake Erie

liquidnight:

Anton Corbijn
Peter Gabriel, 1986
[via Everyday_I_Show]

liquidnight:

Anton Corbijn

Peter Gabriel, 1986

[via Everyday_I_Show]

I love you as certain dark things are to be loved,
in secret, between the shadow and the soul.

“I like punk rock. I like girls with weird eyes. I like drugs. I like passion. I like things that are built well. I like innocence. I like and am grateful for the blue collar worker whose existence allows artists to not have to work at menial jobs. I like killing gluttony. I like playing my cards wrong. I like various styles of music. I like making fun of musicians whom I feel plagiarize or offend music as art by exploiting their embarrassingly pathetic versions of their work. I like to write poetry. I like to ignore others’ poetry. I like vinyl. I like nature and animals. I like to be by myself. I like to feel guilty for being a white, American male.” - Kurt Cobain

“I like punk rock. I like girls with weird eyes. I like drugs. I like passion. I like things that are built well. I like innocence. I like and am grateful for the blue collar worker whose existence allows artists to not have to work at menial jobs. I like killing gluttony. I like playing my cards wrong. I like various styles of music. I like making fun of musicians whom I feel plagiarize or offend music as art by exploiting their embarrassingly pathetic versions of their work. I like to write poetry. I like to ignore others’ poetry. I like vinyl. I like nature and animals. I like to be by myself. I like to feel guilty for being a white, American male.” - Kurt Cobain

(Source: happy-blood)

(Source: cherrybam)

Feelings that come back are feelings that never left.
dat-sick:

Philippe Caza
Les Monstres du Placard, 1970

dat-sick:

Philippe Caza

Les Monstres du Placard, 1970

santmat:

The Journey Into Light and Sound: Inner Seeing and Listening
The distinctive characteristic of surat shabd yoga [inner Light and Sound Meditation] is its emphasis on listening to the inner sound current, known variously as shabd, nad, or audible life stream. It is through this union of the soul with the primordial music of the universe that the practice derives its name (surat — soul, shabd — sound current; yoga — union). To be able to achieve a consciously induced near-death state takes great effort. Hence, masters of this path emphasize a three-fold method designed to still the mind and vacate the body: simran, dhyan, and bhajan.
Simran, the repetition of a holy name or names, draws one’s attention to the eye center, keeping thoughts from being scattered too far outside. Such sacred remembrance is similar in form to the use of a mantra or special prayer, except that the name(s) are repeated silently with the mind and not with the tongue. This stage, according to practitioners, is the first and perhaps most difficult leg of meditation.
Dhyan, contemplation within, is a technical procedure to hold one’s attention at the third eye focus. In the beginning this may be simply gazing into the darkness or re-imaging the guru’s face, etc., but it eventually develops into seeing light of various shapes. Out of this light appears the “radiant form” of one’s spiritual master, who guides the neophyte on the inner voyage and becomes the central point of dhyan.
Bhajan, listening to the celestial melody or sound, is the last and most important part of surat shabd yoga, because it is the vehicle by which the meditator can travel to exalted planes of awareness. Whereas simran draws and dhyan holds the mind’s attention, it is bhajan which takes awareness on its upward ascent back to the Supreme Abode, Sach Khand. Naturally, mastery of surat shabd yoga is not an overnight affair, but involves years of consistent application and struggle. The desired results, adepts in the tradition agree, being largely due to the earnestness and day to day practice of the seeker.
— Enchanted Land: http://www.scribd.com/doc/151013915/Enchanted-Land#page=99

santmat:

The Journey Into Light and Sound: Inner Seeing and Listening

The distinctive characteristic of surat shabd yoga [inner Light and Sound Meditation] is its emphasis on listening to the inner sound current, known variously as shabd, nad, or audible life stream. It is through this union of the soul with the primordial music of the universe that the practice derives its name (surat — soul, shabd — sound current; yoga — union). To be able to achieve a consciously induced near-death state takes great effort. Hence, masters of this path emphasize a three-fold method designed to still the mind and vacate the body: simran, dhyan, and bhajan.

Simran, the repetition of a holy name or names, draws one’s attention to the eye center, keeping thoughts from being scattered too far outside. Such sacred remembrance is similar in form to the use of a mantra or special prayer, except that the name(s) are repeated silently with the mind and not with the tongue. This stage, according to practitioners, is the first and perhaps most difficult leg of meditation.

Dhyan, contemplation within, is a technical procedure to hold one’s attention at the third eye focus. In the beginning this may be simply gazing into the darkness or re-imaging the guru’s face, etc., but it eventually develops into seeing light of various shapes. Out of this light appears the “radiant form” of one’s spiritual master, who guides the neophyte on the inner voyage and becomes the central point of dhyan.

Bhajan, listening to the celestial melody or sound, is the last and most important part of surat shabd yoga, because it is the vehicle by which the meditator can travel to exalted planes of awareness. Whereas simran draws and dhyan holds the mind’s attention, it is bhajan which takes awareness on its upward ascent back to the Supreme Abode, Sach Khand. Naturally, mastery of surat shabd yoga is not an overnight affair, but involves years of consistent application and struggle. The desired results, adepts in the tradition agree, being largely due to the earnestness and day to day practice of the seeker.

— Enchanted Land: http://www.scribd.com/doc/151013915/Enchanted-Land#page=99